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Poetry Landmarks of Britain

Associated Place

14 St George's Terrace - Millom

 

(Associated Place)

details: This is the house where Norman Nicholson the poet and author was born,lived ALL his life and died

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7 Elm Grove

 

(Associated Place)

details: Home of the poet Wilfred Owen.
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74 Rodney Street

 

(Associated Place)

details: Home of the poet Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-61)
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Adam's Arms Pub

 

(Associated Place)

details: Site of the first ever Apples & Snakes poetry performance in 1982.
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Adlestrop

 

(Associated Place)

details: Adlestrop is the village where Edward Thomas's express train drew up, a moment immortalised in his poem of the same name. The station sign is still th...
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Alfoxden Park House

 

(Associated Place)

details: One of the most important poetry landmarks in the UK. The house rented by William and Dorothy Wordsworth and frequented by Coleridge, who lived in ne...
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Andrew Marvell's cottage site and associated sundial

 

(Associated Place)

details: The garden of Lauderdale House has a sundial that used to be surrounded by 'hours 'picked out in herbs. There is also a plaque with a relevant quote f...
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Ashton Church

 

(Associated Place)

details: The C17 proto-feminist poet, Lady Mary Chudleigh,worshipped at Ashton church,(memorials to the family here) and lived next door at "Place". Her many p...
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Auden's Bristol Street

 

(Associated Place)

details: This street appears in the opening line of Auden's 'As I walked out one evening'.
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Bachelor's Club, Tarbolton, Scotland

 

(Associated Place)

details: A favourite haunt of Scottish poet Robert Burns, the Bachelor's Club is now owned by the National Trust for Scotland and open to the general public. T...
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Bam-Bou Restaurant (formerly the Tour Eiffel)

 

(Associated Place)

details: This restaurant, known then as the Tour Eiffel, was where the radical English art magazine _Blast_ was planned by Ezra Pound, Wyndham Lewis and others...
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BBC Coventry & Warwickshire

 

(Associated Place)

details: BBC Coventry & Warwickshire in partnership with Coventry Library and Information Services and Warwickshire Libraries and Information Service announce ...
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Beeny Cliff

 

(Associated Place)

details: Poem by Thomas Hardy. "Beeny Cliff: March 1870-March 1913". Written after the death of his first wife Emma Hardy.
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Bench from Adlestrop Station made famous by Edward Thomas

 

(Associated Place)

details: Edward Thomas was a great poet. This landmark is a moving place for anyone who appreciates his poetry. The poem Adlestrop, is inscribed on a metal pla...
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Bredon Hill

 

(Associated Place)

details: "In summertime on Bredon" by A.E.Housman (1859-1936). Beautifully set to music by Graham Peel (1877-1937) in a version published in 1911.
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Brownsbank Cottage

 

(Associated Place)

details: Former home of leading Scottish 20th century poet and writer Hugh MacDiarmid - he and his wife Valda lived here for many years and it is now restored ...
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Burns Cottage and Museum, Alloway

 

(Associated Place)

details: This is the birthplace of one of Scotland's most famous poets, Robert Burns. The cottage has been restored in the same style as it was during Burn's l...
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Burns House Museum

 

(Associated Place)

details: The Burns House Museum is the house that Burns lived in during his married life. On display is a selection of signed manuscripts, some personal items ...
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Burns National Heritage Park, Alloway

 

(Associated Place)

details: This park is the setting for one of Robert Burns' most famous poems, Tam O'Shanter. Referred to as the 'Tam O'Shanter experience', visitors can see an...
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Carn Euny

 

(Associated Place)

details: An iron age village west of Penzance. A new poem by Ann Alexander was inspired by Carn Euny. She is published by Peterloo Poets .
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Castle Mound, Cambridge

 

(Associated Place)

details: The Mound has offered a unique view of Cambridge since the University's inception. A huge proportion of the great poets who attended the University, i...
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Cauis College, Cambridge

 

(Associated Place)

details: Thomas Shadwell (1642-1693) was admitted to Cauis College, Cambridge in 1656. Although he didn't actually gain a degree, he later went on to become Po...
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Chilswell House

 

(Associated Place)

details: Chilswell House, now known as Carmelite Priory, was where Robert Bridges (1844-1930) lived and died. Bridges was a qualified and practising physician ...
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Clare Hall, Cambridge

 

(Associated Place)

details: Poet Laureate William Whitehead was probably most associated with Clare Hall, Cambridge in terms of both a landmark and an institution. He first arriv...
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Coleridge Cottage

 

(Associated Place)

details: Samuel Taylor Coleridge lived at the cottage for a few years from 1797 during which he wrote some of his most famous poetry with William and Dorothy W...
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Coleridge Cottage

 

(Associated Place)

details: Coleridge lived here when he wrote some of his best poetry, such as The Ancient Mariner and Christabel
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Coopers Hill

 

(Associated Place)

details: Denham's magnificent poem was inspired by the view.
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Coten End, Warwick

 

(Associated Place)

details: Philip Larkin lived with his parents at 73 Coten End, Warwick during the 1940s. In 1943 he was working in a dull job which he hated at the Fuel Office...
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Donne's effigy, St Paul's Cathedral

 

(Associated Place)

details: It was the only monument to survive the Great Fire of 1666. It was sculpted from life but shows him in his shroud. It is a real connection with him an...
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Dove Cottage

 

(Associated Place)

details: I lived in Ambleside in 1977-8, and Dove Cottage was part of my mental as well as geographical environment. In particular, I fell in love with Dorothy...
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Dove Cottage and Wordsworth Museum

 

(Associated Place)

details: For the charm and atmosphere of Dove Cottage and the Wordsworth Museum, for the importance of the Wordsworth Trust as a research centre for British Ro...
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dover beach

 

(Associated Place)

details:
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Drury Lane Theatre, London

 

(Associated Place)

details: Drury Lane is famous for a number of reasons, but a name that especially comes to mind is that of Colley Cibber (1671-1757). Actor, theatre manager, p...
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Dryden House

 

(Associated Place)

details: Dryden House, Northamptonshire, was the birthplace of the former Poet Laureate (1668-88), John Dryden. Although Dryden spent the majority of his life ...
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Dumfries

 

(Associated Place)

details: Dumfries, the County town of Dumfries and Galloway, is a prosperous Royal Borough on the banks of the Nith. The poet Robbie Burns made Dumfries his h...
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Dylan Thomas birthplace and home

 

(Associated Place)

details: A philanthropic Swansea couple have restored Dylan's home back to 1914 when he was born there. Run by volunteers, it is the most relaxed and inform...
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Dymock

 

(Associated Place)

details: In the years leading up to the First World War, literary history was being made around the village of Dymock in the valley of the River Leadon. Six...
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Easington Old School House, East Yorkshire

 

(Associated Place)

details: This is the birthplace of Robin Skelton, British and Canadian poet, 1925-1997. He was author of over 100 books, English Prof. at Univ of British Colum...
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East Coker

 

(Associated Place)

details: East Coker, the subject of one of Eliot's "Four Quartets", is the birthplace of his ancestors. His heart is buried at the Parish Church. The village i...
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East Coker Church

 

(Associated Place)

details: A magic visit to this church, where T S Eliot, author of 'East Coker', one of the 'Four Quartets', is commemorated. My husband read aloud the poem jus...
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Faringdon House, Oxfordshire

 

(Associated Place)

details: In 1780 Henry James Pye built the current Faringdon House near the original site, north of All Saints Church. The original one burnt down just after P...
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Frances Horovitz's grave

 

(Associated Place)

details: Frances Horovitz was a much-loved poet who died of cancer on 2nd October, 1983. Her grave has already become a place of pilgrimage and there is a memo...
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Garrard's Farm, Uffington

 

(Associated Place)

details: Sir John Betjeman was actively involved in village life in Uffington. During the 1930s he and his wife Penelope rented Garrards Farm and he became Peo...
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Greenaway

 

(Associated Place)

details: Site of a Betjeman poem
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Greta Hall, Keswick

 

(Associated Place)

details: Greta Hall was former home of the Lakes poets Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey. Built around 1800, it was Southey's home for forty years. So...
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Hardy's cottage

 

(Associated Place)

details: Thomas Hardy was born in 1840 in this small thatched cottage. It was built by his grandfather in 1800. Hardy left at the age of 22 and returned 5 ye...
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Haworth

 

(Associated Place)

details: The influence of the moors on the Brontes seems too obvious to mention but for anyone wanting inspiration I know of nowhere which offers such immedia...
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Haworth Parsonage

 

(Associated Place)

details: This was the home of Charlotte, Branwell, Emily and Ann and this was where their master pieces were born in the early Nineteenth Century. Haworth was ...
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Home of Felicia Hemans

 

(Associated Place)

details: Home of the 18th Century poet, Felicia Hemans at the height of her fame.
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Hull

 

(Associated Place)

details: Hull is the birthplace of Andrew Marvell and Stevie Smith, and more recently the home, temporary or otherwise, to a remarkable collection of twentieth...
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Hydro Hotel, Kilmacolm, Renfrewshire

 

(Associated Place)

details: This is a hotel that no longer exists, a ghost landmark. My father stayed in the hotel in the 1960s on a speculative visit to Scotland, before I was b...
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Imperial War Museum North

 

(Associated Place)

details: Mario Petrucci's poems on plinths and a huge wall stencil near the entrance to the main space, written while he was poet in residence at the Imperial ...
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Itteringham

 

(Associated Place)

details: Home of late George Barker.
Poems set in immediate locality ( upper Bure valley).
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Ivor Cutler's house

 

(Associated Place)

details: I appreciate Mr Cutler's devotion to words in a poetic form, evident throughout the course of his life.
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Ivor Gurneys gravestone

 

(Associated Place)

details: Ivor Gurney is one of Britians semi-forgotten poets and it's a beautiful spot worth visiting in itself. The original gravestone should also be returne...
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John Clare Country

 

(Associated Place)

details: John Clare from a very humble beginnings in Helpston, managed to write an unsurpassed history of early nineteenth century local life and times, no oth...
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Keats House

 

(Associated Place)

details: Keats House was my first place of pilgrimage, on my first visit to London, at the age of 18, nearly 25 years ago, when I was writing my own heartfe...
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Keats House

 

(Associated Place)

details: This house and garden remain largely unchanged, are well maintained and in themselves are beautiful. Great poems were written here, with much joy and...
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Keats House, Hampstead

 

(Associated Place)

details: This house is where John Keats lived from 1818 to 1820 with his friend Charles Brown. It is where he wrote some of his most intensely moving poems in...
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Landor House

 

(Associated Place)

details: The poet Walter Savage Landor was born in this house in Warwick in 1775. It has been part of the King's High School for Girls since 1879. The poet liv...
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Laugharne

 

(Associated Place)

details: Laugharne rather than Swansea is most commonly associated with Dylan Thomas. He first visited it in 1934, describing it as "the strangest town in Wal...
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Little Barford, Bedfordshire

 

(Associated Place)

details: Nicholas Rowe (1674 - 1718) was born and baptised in Little Barford, Bedfordshire. He went on to be Poet Laureate from 1715-18 and was also the first ...
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Lochinver

 

(Associated Place)

details: The dramatically beautiful Assynt area - it's landscape, lochs, harbours, mountains and people - are lovingly and meticulously celebrated in the poetr...
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Martinhoe, Devon

 

(Associated Place)

details: H.D stayed at Martinhoe with Richard Aldington(her then husband)during the early months of 1916. They walked, bathed, visited Heddon's Mouth and wrote...
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Millom

 

(Associated Place)

details: The whole of Millom is associated with Norman Nicholson (1914 - 1987). Not only can you take tea in his former house, 14 St George's Terrace, which i...
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Milton's Cottage, Chalfont St Giles

 

(Associated Place)

details: This beautifully preserved cottage is the 'small box' that Milton retreated to from London during the height of the plague. There he wrote Paradise Lo...
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Milton's Mulberry Tree

 

(Associated Place)

details: Milton's Mulberry Tree was planted in the year of Milton's birth (1608) in the Fellows' Garden at Christ's College. Milton was admitted to study at Ch...
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Morden Tower

 

(Associated Place)

details: One of the oldest poetry venues in England with a fantastic record of poets reading there - Basil Bunting, Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney - and still lots ...
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Mount St Mary's College

 

(Associated Place)

details: Where Gerard Manley Hopkins lived and worked, and wrote some of his best-loved poems. He was a schoolmaster and Jesuit priest there.
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Mytholmroyd

 

(Associated Place)

details: Poet Laureate Ted Hughes was born on 7 August 1930 at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd. Although he moved away from the village, he later returned in th...
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Newstead Abbey

 

(Associated Place)

details: Its strong links with the great romantic poet Lord Byron
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Parnassus Hill (Parliament Hill fields)

 

(Associated Place)

details: Hill of poets, Gods & Oracles & inspiration of many poets such as Keats, Coleridge, Betjeman, Plath & myself!
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Poetry Hunt - Imperial War Museum

 

(Associated Place)

details: On my first trip to the War Museum I was surprised and impressed to notice poems "hiding" amongst the exhibits. I was inspired to write one of my own...
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Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey

 

(Associated Place)

details: Geoffrey Chaucer was the first poet to be buried in Westminster Abbey. He was joined over 150 years later by Edmund Spenser, and subsequently by poets...
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Polesworth Abbey, Warwickshire.

 

(Associated Place)

details: Poleworth Abbey was once the site of Polesworth Hall the home of the Goodere Family. It is here that the Literary Circle met and included such names a...
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Railway Bridge on the A436

 

(Associated Place)

details: This bridge, where the Stow on the Wold - Chipping Norton road crosses the Oxford - Worcester railway is the closest structure to Adlestrop station, w...
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River Cole

 

(Associated Place)

details: The river Cole is close by to where I spent my latter teen years and I live not far from it now also. It is also the river associated with old J.R.R...
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Rudstone East YORKSHIRE

 

(Associated Place)

details: This is the churchyard where the poet and writer Winifred Holtby is buried with the famous epitaph on the headstone "God give me work till my life is ...
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Scott's view

 

(Associated Place)

details: Scott's view is a spot giving spectacular views of the Scottish Borders, where Sir Walter Scott lived. There is a plaque at this place which has on i...
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Siegfried Sassoon's grave

 

(Associated Place)

details: This is where Siegfried Sassoon is buried. The grave stone is simple yet clear.
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Skelton Festival - Diss Norfolk

 

(Associated Place)

details: 2004 is the year long DISS festival celebrating John Skelton as rector and poet laureate in 1504. There are many different activities which appeal to ...
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Slough

 

(Associated Place)

details: Slough is perhaps an anti-poetry landmark, after Betjeman's invocation to those "friendly bombs" to fall on it. Residents of Slough may feel a corresp...
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Somersby Rectory

 

(Associated Place)

details: Tennyson was born here; his father was the vicar at Somersby. Many of his early poems are inspired by the Lincolnshire countryside, including The Broo...
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Soutar House

 

(Associated Place)

details: Soutar House was the residence of the poet William Soutar.
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ST 182 335 (OS map ref)

 

(Associated Place)

details: Here is the spot at which Edward Thomas brought to a close his book 'In Pursuit of Spring', the starting point for his poetry. It is a place with view...
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St Andrews: the Poetry Capital of Scotland

 

(Associated Place)

details: The town of St Andrews - where StAnza: Scotland's Poetry Festival takes place every March - can easily claim to be the poetry capital of Scotland. He...
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St Enodoc Church

 

(Associated Place)

details: This is where Sir John Betjeman is buried as the church and surrounding area inspired much of his poetry. It's breathtaking around this part of Cornwa...
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St Mary Immaculate RC Church, Warwick

 

(Associated Place)

details: JRR Tolkien was married to Edith Bratt in this church on 22 March 1916. In November 1915 he sent Edith a poem he had just written while at a First Wor...
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St Mary's College, Oscott

 

(Associated Place)

details: St Mary's College Oscott was founded in 1793 by a committee composing of Catholic nobility and English gentry. Among the famous alumni was Alfred Aust...
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St Michael's Church, East Coker, TS Eliot's grave

 

(Associated Place)

details: East Coker is the spiritual home of TS Eliot, the greatest poet of the 20th Century. He was buried at St Michael's church, and many people come from ...
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St Peter's School, York

 

(Associated Place)

details: St Peter's School, York was attended by the Poet Laureate Laurence Eusden in the 1700s. Frequently satirised by Alexander Pope amongst others, Eusden ...
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St. Peter and St. Paul, Yattendon

 

(Associated Place)

details: Robert Bridges, the Poet Laureate who straddled the 19th and 20th centuries, compiled the Yattendon Hymnal for this very church, writing the verse.
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Stevie Smith's home

 

(Associated Place)

details: Stevie Smith, who wrote 'Not Waving but Drowning' lived nearly all her life in this house. A poet whose poems on life and death and cats and God walk ...
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Stinsford Church, Dorset

 

(Associated Place)

details: Cecil Day-Lewis, poet-laureate from 1967-72 is buried in Stinsford Churchyard, Dorset. As a great admirer of Thomas Hardy, he requested this graveyard...
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Stoke Poges Churchyard & Gardens of Rest

 

(Associated Place)

details: It is a nice place by the river Thames,tranquil and relaxing. The Chruchyard was where Gray wrote his famous elegy. A monument or tomb is in a nearb...
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Stoneypath

 

(Associated Place)

details: Ian Hamilton Finlay lives here and made a wonderful garden full of concrete poetry.It can be visited from June to Setember.
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Stowe Landscape Gardens, National Trust

 

(Associated Place)

details: Many poets were involved in the creation of Stowe's classical 18th Century public Gardens, Pope and Thompson in particular. But these gardens have a ...
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Stromness Orkney

 

(Associated Place)

details: Birthplace and home of George Mckay Brown for most of his life. Was the inspiration for
much of his poetry and prose
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Suilven - mountain

 

(Associated Place)

details: Norman MacCaig's life long and many faceted love affair with the mountain of Suilven is reflected in many of his poems. Climbing the mountain with tho...
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Swanston village, Edinburgh

 

(Associated Place)

details: Strong associations with two poets, R L Stevenson and Edwin Muir. Swanston House was the home of RLS's grandfather, and in his youth RLS spent happy ...
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Sylvia Plath's gravestone

 

(Associated Place)

details: SYLVIA Plath's gravestone, located in the hilltop village of Heptonstall near Hebden Bridge, is a popular pilgrimage destination. It bears the lines: ...
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Sylvia Plath's house

 

(Associated Place)

details: Plath and Hughes lived here from 1960 through August 1961. As far as I am aware she wrote a lot of the poetry for Ariel here.
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Tay Railway Bridge

 

(Associated Place)

details: A physical landmark that marks the low point in Britain's poetry landscape - it inspired the most famous poem by the world's worst poet: William McGon...
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Ted Hughes' Birthplace

 

(Associated Place)

details:
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Tennyson Down

 

(Associated Place)

details: Tennyson lived many of his later years at Faringford (now an hotel), Freshwater Bay, Isle of Wight. To escape visitors he had a wooden bridge built ru...
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Tennyson Monument

 

(Associated Place)

details: The Alfred, Lord Tennyson Monument, made of Cornish granite and standing 38' high, is on Tennyson Down between Freshwater Bay and The Needles in the f...
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The Bronte Parsonage, Howarth

 

(Associated Place)

details: The stuunning scenery around Howarth and the hauntingly beautiful town itself make this a wonderful place to write - little wonder that the poetry of ...
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The Cross Bath, Bath.

 

(Associated Place)

details: The Cross Bath in Bath is the poetic heart of Aquae Sulis. A place of meditation, contemplation and sanctuary. Reclaim it for its original purpose!...
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The Crown Inn

 

(Associated Place)

details: Sir William Davenant (1606-1668), appointed Poet Laureate in 1638, after the death of Ben Jonson. Davenant was closely associated with Shakespeare (ru...
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The Everyman Theatre

 

(Associated Place)

details: Along with Steates Coffee Bar and O'Connors' Tavern, the Everyman played host to readings by the Liverpool Scene during the 1960s.
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The Hanbury Arms, Caerleon

 

(Associated Place)

details: Caerleon, South Wales, is one of several places that lay claim to having been the site of King Arthur's court. According to a plaque, placed by the...
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The home of Wilfred Owen

 

(Associated Place)

details: 71 Monkmoor RD is the House that Wilfred Owen left to go to war and was never to return to.
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The Knapp, Ledbury

 

(Associated Place)

details: John Masefield (1878-1967), Poet Laureate from 1930-67 was born in a house called The Knapp in Ledbury, Herefordshire. Although Masefield didn't live ...
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The Liverpool Sound

 

(Associated Place)

details: It marked the coming together in the 1960s of 3 Liverpool poets; Brian Patten, Adrian Henri and Roger McGough. They spoke with highly individual voic...
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The Munster Literature Centre/Frank O'Connor Birthplace

 

(Associated Place)

details: Founded in 1993, the Munster Literature Centre (Tigh Litríochta) is a non-profit arts organisation dedicated to the promotion and celebration of lite...
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The Place Theatre

 

(Associated Place)

details: The Place is the home of the London Contemporary Dance School and the place to see some of the leading exponents of contemporary dance. Previously the...
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The River Anker - Polesworth

 

(Associated Place)

details: Poet Michael Drayton (1563-1631), a contemprary of William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson, was born in Hartshill not far from here and educated at Poleswo...
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The Touchstone

 

(Associated Place)

details: The Touchstone is the first standing stone or Menhir to be raised on Dartmoor for several thousand years. It has been inscribed with one of poet John ...
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Thomas Hardy's Cottage

 

(Associated Place)

details: Hardy is a poet whose supreme gifts aren't given the attention they deserve. The same is true of John Clare.
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Tintern Abbey

 

(Associated Place)

details: key moment in British poetry, when Wordsworth came in sight of Tintern Abbey then wrote about the experience
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Tintern Abbey

 

(Associated Place)

details: I remember seeing this wonderful abbey as a child and then discovering Wordsworth's poem.
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Trinity College Ante Chapel

 

(Associated Place)

details: Trinity College ante chapel is where the Poet Laureate Thomas Warton was buried. Brother of Joseph Warton, Thomas had an affiliation with Trinity for ...
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Turn Lane Cemetery

 

(Associated Place)

details: Grave of the Quaker Poet, Bernard Barton.
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Verlaine & Rimbaud's House

 

(Associated Place)

details: This is the house where Verlaine and Rimbaud took rooms in 1873. Imagine two of the greatest French poets giving lessons at 10 shillings an hour to E...
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Villa Park

 

(Associated Place)

details: It was mentioned in Philip Larkin's poem, MCMXIV, line 4, when he said 'as if they were stretched outside the Oval or Villa Park...', refering to the ...
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Wace memorial stone

 

(Associated Place)

details: Wace, the Jersey-born poet who described the Battle of Hastings and set down the Arthur legend, is commemorated in his birthplace by a granite plaque ...
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Watchet Harbour

 

(Associated Place)

details: Watchet was an inspiratiomn to Colerdige (whos cottage is not far) and a statute has been erected to commermorate the ancient mariner, which he wrote ...
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Westminster

 

(Associated Place)

details: Ben Jonson (1572-1637) was born in Westminster, educated at St Martin's Lane and Westminster School and buried at Westminster Abbey.
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Westminster Bridge

 

(Associated Place)

details: William Wordsworth wrote this lovely sonnet standing on the bridge at dawn. Even though London has changed enormously, the great quiet of the river i...
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Whitby

 

(Associated Place)

details: Whitby Abbey, famous in its own right as a sacred site and for the Synod of 664 which shaped the direction of the western Christian Church, was also t...
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Wordsworth House

 

(Associated Place)

details: It's a beautiful house, imposing and gracious, yet sitting easily among the more modest other buildings in the street. Knowing Wordsworth was born the...
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Wordsworth's Tree, Cheapside

 

(Associated Place)

details: 'At the corner of Wood Street, when daylight appears, Hangs a Thrush that sings loud, it has sung for three years; Poor Susan has passed by the spot...
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wow gold

 

(Associated Place)

details: Buy wow gold now.Welcome to our website about wow gold,delivery...
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zmvoxydfdzq

 

(Associated Place)

details: UjFZEx fhewkjzjjacx, [url=http://bcjsqonamrhk.com/]bcjsqonamrhk[/url], [link=http://cpfbrimiltzy.com/]cpfbrimi...
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